Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

The Ken & Ruth Davee Department of Neurology

Michael D Ellis, DPT

Michael D Ellis, DPT

Associate Professor of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences

Focus of Work

Bio

My current translational research efforts involve the administration of a double-blinded randomized controlled trial studying two different robotic strength training programs in adults with chronic stroke. I am the PI/Program Director of this NIDRR-funded trial. My current basic research efforts employ several innovative methods, including rehabilitation robotics, for quantifying multi-joint upper extremity movement control during both postural and movement tasks in an effort to elucidate neural...[Read full text]My current translational research efforts involve the administration of a double-blinded randomized controlled trial studying two different robotic strength training programs in adults with chronic stroke. I am the PI/Program Director of this NIDRR-funded trial. My current basic research efforts employ several innovative methods, including rehabilitation robotics, for quantifying multi-joint upper extremity movement control during both postural and movement tasks in an effort to elucidate neural mechanisms underlying impaired movement and subsequent restoration of normal movement in individuals with stroke. All of my work is in collaboration with Julius P.A. Dewald, PT, PhD and is further augmented by collaborations with colleagues with expertise in neural imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. I also specialize in the training of Physical and Occupational Therapists in the administration of impairment, activity, and participation limitation assessments for individuals with stroke and the subsequent processes necessary for standardized delivery of assessments in clinical trials. Through my clinical research efforts I hope to contribute to the evolution of rehabilitation medicine and science by advancing neurological rehabilitation principles and techniques. The key component most likely to impact rehabilitation in this magnitude is the elucidation of the neurological underpinnings responsible for movement discoordination and through the subsequent development of more effective rehabilitation therapies for individuals with functionally debilitating movement impairments.[Shorten text]

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Education and Certification

  • DPT: Emory University (2003)

Contact

312-503-4435

645 N Michigan Avenue, Suite 1100
Chicago IL 60611